The NBA combine is now underway and testing numbers have started to trickle in. Unlike previous seasons, the combine is being held remotely at various facilities. We have kept a close eye on the results in an effort to make sense of these numbers. There have been some wildly explosive scores in comparison to previous league held events. So as you navigate these results, keep in mind that context matters.

Nevertheless, there is a lot of great information here as we wind down the player evaluation phase of the draft. That said, here are your main combine takeaways for the week!

GUARDS

Kira Lewis

Key Combine Stats

  • Wingspan – 6’5″
  • Weight – 180 lbs.

Takeaways

Not much to see here with Kira Lewis. The one thing that stood out is Lewis 15 pounds over his playing weight. So much of his game is predicated on quickness. Lewis is one of the nation’s elite transition players. The quickness also translated in the half-court, where he thrived as a pick and roll playmaker. It will be interesting to monitor if he can maintain the same level of explosion with the added bulk.

One area where the weight may help is at the rim. Lewis was moderately efficient scoring near the basket. His 54% shooting from that range is far below some of the top prospects. The bulk should give Lewis the extra cushion to finish downhill. Kira Lewis is a bonified top 10 talent for me and the combine did nothing to change that. 

Tyrell Terry

Key Combine Stats

  • Weight – 170 lbs. 
  • Shuttle – 2.59 seconds

Takeaways

The big knock on Tyrell Terry coming in was his frail frame. Terry’s playing weight peaked at 160 pounds at Stanford. It appears that he has added substantial muscle to his body. This should help Terry navigate more physical defenders who will prod and poke him in the perimeter. 

I want to see how Terry can diversify his scoring portfolio in the NBA. At 6’3 he has some significant physical limitations. Most of his scoring in college came off the pick and roll, transition and spot up opportunities. Can Terry become the next dribble hand-off weapon? A good shuttle run here is a sign of a player who may be able to separate coming off screens. This combine should validate Terry as a top-15 pick.

Tre Jones

Key Combine Stats

  • Wingspan – 6’5″
  • Max Vertical – 40″
  • Lane Agility – 10.40 seconds

Takeaways

Explosive athletic numbers for Tre Jones. I see Jones as a plus on-ball defender capable to mirror ball handlers and disrupt the flow of the offense. The agility drill is a high indicator of what I saw on film. That is someone who can shuffle his feet and stay in the hip pocket of the defender.

Jones has a deceptively quick first step on the ball. The 40″ vertical is up there among point guard prospects such as Donovan Mitchell and Lonnie Walker. Do I see him as a similar 3-level scorer to Mitchell? No. But there is an element of shot creation off the dribble that should translate.

Grant Riller

Key Combine Stats

  • Wingspan – 6’7″
  • Max Vertical – 39.5″
  • 3/4 Sprint – 3.07 seconds

Takeaways

Grant Riller brings significant three-level scorer potential. Riller scored an impressive 1.36 points per possession near the rim and 0.96 points per dribble jump shot. Riller’s 39.5″ vertical is big. Why? So much of his game is predicated on an electric first step to generate space. This is a sign that the athleticism can translate from small school competition into the NBA.

Riller has work to do to cement himself into the first round. There is some Derrick White to his game. Both players have on ball scoring potential with limited playing vision. Riller’s 3.07 second 3/4 sprint matched White’s combine in 2018. This is a positive sign as someone who can push speed in the open court. I am not completely sold on Riller as a first round prospect. But at the back of the first round, he is a low risk high reward pick. 

Devon Dotson

Key Combine Stats

  • Max Vertical – 40.5″
  • 3/4 Sprint – 3.02 seconds
  • Lane Agility – 10.44 seconds

Takeaways

Devon Dotson is another point guard who showcased his immense athletic profile. The 3.02 second sprint is the second fastest time in this decade (behind Donovan Mitchell’s 3.01). His ability to apply downhill pressure on defenses will be his calling card coming in. Dotson’s 171 free throw attempts last season ranked ahead of higher touted prospects, including Kira Lewis and Malachi Flynn.

Explosion aside, his work now shifts to the basketball court. Dotson must expand his scoring repertoire. That is to improve shooting consistency both off the dribble and as a spot up threat. He was a subpar 33% three point shooter at Kansas. But I think the athletic profile and shot creation element will be too enticing for teams at the end of the first round. Chalk Dotson up as the combine’s biggest winner so far.

WINGS

Tyler Bey

Key Combine Stats

  • Height – 6’6″
  • Wingspan – 7’1.25″
  • Max Vertical – 43.5″

Takeaways

I have Tyler Bey slotted as a wing but you can make the case of him projecting as a small big. I am a bit concerned about where he fits at the next level. But one thing is certain, he is going to bring immediate defensive versatility. Bey’s tape screams of high defensive IQ. At a 43.5″ vertical, you can sprinkle an element of rim protection to his game as well. 

Bey was frequently used as a post up big in Colorado. I do not see that as his path in the NBA. I do like his potential as a rim runner. Bey is super active off the ball, and finished in the 88th percentile among possessions near the rim (per Synergy). His passing vision, defensive potential and explosiveness should warrant a late first round pick. But we will have to see if teams will overlook his scoring shortcomings. 

Ty-Shon Alexander

Key Combine Stats

  • Wingspan – 6’8″
  • Max Vertical – 33″ 
  • Shuttle – 2.47 seconds
  • Shot 50 for 77 in 3 point shooting endurance drill (65%)

Takeaways

Ty-Shon Alexander is flying under the radar and it is about time the draft world takes notice. He is one of the draft’s best point of attack defenders. Some of what made Lu Dort a household name was his length and ability to shuffle his feet against James Harden. Alexander is not as stout physically, but mirrors Dort in length. Alexander’s exceptional shuttle time is a strong indicator of his lateral quickness translating in similar fashion. 

I also love the shot making potential off the catch. Alexander ranked in the 77th percentile in all catch and shoot possessions (per Synergy). He has a high release point that should translate in the pros. Now, do not expect much of him on the ball. Alexander is not an explosive downhill player. The vertical numbers validate the film. Just give him the tough defensive assignments and let him thrive as a shooting outlet. This is a good combine for Alexander, who is likely to slot in the middle of the second round. 

Cassius Stanley

Key Combine Stats

  • Max Vertical – 44″

Takeaways

Well, you can probably hand Cassius Stanley the next dunk contest trophy. This is Hamidou Diallo range we are in now. Since 2013, only Diallo Shane Larkin, Pat Connaughton and Kay Felder have recorded a 44″+ max vertical at the combine. Stanley’s athleticism is off the charts, and it shows up primiarly in transition. His 1.29 points per transition opportunity ranks in the 88th percentile (per Synergy). In other words, blink and he’s gone.

What is next for Stanley? A lot. He has enticing potential, but must show improvements as a ball handler. Imagine a world where Stanley can harness his explosiveness into shot creation for himself (and others). That would change the conversation about Cassius Stanley entirely. Right now I have Stanley as one of the draft’s biggest steals. But it’s going to take a gamble on the idea that he can eventually develop into more than a Sportscenter highlight. 

Mason Jones

Key Combine Stats

  • Max Vertical – 36″
  • Body Fat – 6%
  • Shot 248 for 316 from the field (78%)
  • Shot 98 for 100 from the free throw line (98%)

Takeaways

Mason Jones is another name that is starting to rise up the boards. Most are (rightfully) fixated on his running mate at Arkansas in Isaiah Joe. But Jones was the Razorbacks’ swiss army knife. He can operate in the pick and roll, knife you in transition and space the court as a spot up threat. He even brings a bit of juice scoring off the dribble.

Jones can benefit from a slimmer body and a professional conditioning program. Squeezing a bit more juice athletically is big. But overall, there is a lot to like as an early to mid second round prospect. Jones finished the season shooting 35% on 7.4 three point attempts per 40 minutes. That is significant volume. The free throw numbers indicate strong shooting mechanics. So, keep an eye on Mason Jones in round two!

BIGS

Zeke Nnaji

Key Combine Stats

  • Wingspan – 7’2″
  • Weight – 248 lbs
  • Max Vertical – 38″
  • Lane Agility – 10.95 seconds

Takeaways

Nnaji clocked in about 8 pounds heavier from his Arizona days. This is important as he lacks functional power to anchor defensively. Nnaji projects as a small rim running five. Both the 38″ vertical and 7’2″ wingspan support his role as a lob threat. Brandon Clarke, who I see Nnaji modeling his game after, topped at 40″ last season.

The 10.95-second lane agility number falls in a similar range to Grant Williams. He is another versatile big who can move and defend in the perimeter. Overall this was a positive combine for Nnaji, which may help to nudge him into the back end of the first round. 

Daniel Oturu

Key Combine Stats

  • Wingspan – 7’4″
  • Weight – 240 lbs.
  • Lane Agility – 11.37 seconds
  • Shot 104 for 154 in 3-point drills (67.5%)

Takeaways

Daniel Oturu is a raw talent who displayed significant improvements in his second season in Minnesota. The one thing that stood out is how much he struggled with Big 10 strength. Oturu clocked in at a similar playing weight, which is concerning. He is going to have to prove that he can handle the physicality on both ends, or that could leave him without a venue for minutes. 

Oturu also brings significant floor-spacing potential. He has an elongated release, but good touch as a modern big. I love his defensive ceiling as a disruptor and shot blocker. Oturu’s 7’4″ wingspan should translate in space as someone who can clog passing lanes and rotate to the rim. I do not think this will be enough to push him into the first round. But there is a lot there for a developmental big in the early to the middle part of round two. 

Kaleb Wesson

Key Combine Stats

  • Wingspan – 7’3.25″
  • Body Fat – 12.50%
  • Max Vertical- 27″
  • Shot 56 for 77 in 3-point drills (72%)

Takeaways

I am concerned about Wessons’ ability to move in space. He has stiff footwork and he can benefit from carrying less weight. I do not think the combine helped ease those fears. He is going to provide limited value as a rim protector and switchable defender. Wesson is another high IQ defender. His length and feel defending the pick and roll is a plus, and it should translate in some capacity. 

On the flip side, there is a lot to like in the pick and pop game. Wesson is one of the draft’s best screen setters, and can easily pop out for a three point look. Per synergy, Wesson shot 1.19 points per jump shot possession (94th percentile). He has phenomenal feel to relocate for the open shot. This combine falls in line with what I expected for Wesson. Good value to bank on at the back end of the second round. 

Stay tuned as we continue to track the NBA combine going into the draft on November 18th! More names are tricking in and we will have them covered just for you. Don’t forget to lock into our full draft coverage on The Painted Lines. Here you will find a comprehensive list of player write ups and video analysis of your favorite prospects.

Your Comprehensive Philadelphia 76ers 2020 NBA Draft Guide